Monthly Archives: February 2015

Responsibility to our Training Partners

Keith Farrell (left) fencing with Federico Malagutti (right). Not much protective gear, but suitable gear for the type of sparring and to achieve the purpose of the exercise.

Keith Farrell (left) fencing with Federico Malagutti (right). Not much protective gear, but suitable gear for the type of sparring and to achieve the purpose of the exercise.

 

We often take our training partners for granted. However, we should not be so blasé – our training partners are important people, who help us learn, and who deserve our respect and care. We have a duty and responsibility to look after our training partners, to keep them safe, and to help them develop their skills just as they help us to develop our own.

 

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Mythologising medieval swordsmen

One sentiment sometimes expressed by HEMA practitioners is that we modern swordsmen have no chance of ever becoming as proficient as historic swordsmen, and that these swordsmen would have been trained so extensively and from such an early age that they would have had amazing mechanics and tactical awareness. For an example of this attitude, please see this quote from a recent Facebook post on the Dimicator page.

As an instructor of historical swordsmanship, this confirms my suspicion, that it is close to impossible for modern practitioners to even come close to the skill and expertise of our forebears, who, since early childhood, must have had a clear idea of what fighting practice or even true combat looked like and they certainly imitated it in their play, much like modern kids imitate their personal sports idols today. Later they were trained by veterans of the respective arts, be it in a fencing guild or a military unit. They exclusively used the correct weapons and tools and had participated in according sports contests. They had never made all the stupid mistakes we see at every single HEMA event, simply because they had always seen what expert distance management, sound tactics, correct body and weapon mechanics look like and how they are to be applied.”[1]

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Introducing New Students to Sparring

Most schools have a particular method for introducing new members to the exercise of sparring. The school will have chosen this method because it fits their circumstances and because, for whatever reason, the instructors believe the method makes sense.

I have experienced and heard of several methods, so this short article will investigate a handful of methods and will hopefully stimulate some thought and discussion within schools about how to manage the issue.

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What is a “Claymore”?

Is this a "claymore"? Short answer: no, it is not. It is a very nice sword, nonetheless. Photo by Søren Niedziella from Albion Europe ApS.

Is this a “claymore”?
Short answer: no, it is not.
Nonetheless, it is a very pretty sword.
Photo by Søren Niedziella from Albion Europe ApS.

 

A question that appears regularly is “what is a claymore?” There is a persistent misunderstanding about what the term means, where it comes from, and to which sword it refers.

This blog article will attempt to provide some answers and to be an easy point of reference whenever the subject is discussed.

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